Meet our Summer Interns!

We are extremely grateful for the support and hard work of our summer interns.  What a talented and compassionate group of students!

L to R: Natalie Holdstock, Garden & Wellness Coordinator Jesse Crouch, and Doha Medani helping fill bags of produce for Cooking Matters participants to take home.

L to R: Natalie Holdstock, Garden & Wellness Coordinator Jesse Crouch, and Doha Medani helping fill bags of produce for Cooking Matters participants to take home.

Doha Medani: Doha is a rising senior at N.C. State. She is pursing a bachelor's degree in Nutritional Science. Doha was connected to Alliance Medical Ministry through Health Career Connection, a summer, public health internship program. Doha has been working closely Jesse, our Garden and Wellness coordinator. 

"During my time here, I've learned that holistic community-focused healthcare leads to invaluable results for patients! I love that AMM's work and mission stems from a deep compassion for others, which I truly admire. Thankfully, I've experienced that same warmth in every encounter I've had this summer!" 

Natalie Holdstock: Natalie is completing her undergraduate studies and will receive her bachelor's degree in Public Health this August. Natalie's course work required a semester long internship. She was connected to Alliance through a friend and knew it would be the perfect place to complete her internship. This summer, Natalie has worked with Dr. Joyner tracking diabetes patients as well as some communications and marketing projects. Natalie plans to study Spanish in the fall and complete a Spanish immersion program in the spring. She also plans to pursue a master's degree in Public Health in the following fall. 

"I have really enjoyed my time as an intern here, at Alliance. I have learned a lot and I have really been able to see all of the different aspects that make Alliance what it is. There is always such a positive atmosphere and I think that is something people (patients, staff, volunteers) really value. The compassion that is shown for patients, I think, goes above and beyond. It has been a great experience.
L to R:  Sara Pascucci, LPC, and Crystal Rivera, prior to seeing patients in the Purple Pod. 

L to R:  Sara Pascucci, LPC, and Crystal Rivera, prior to seeing patients in the Purple Pod. 

Crystal Rivera:   Crystal joined LPC Sara Pascucci, seeing patients through Alliance's Pastoral Care & Counseling Program this summer. Crystal is in a dual degree program, working towards a Masters of Divinity at Duke University, and Masters of Social Work from UNC-Chapel Hill.

"I was drawn to Alliance based on the idea that the practice provides patients with 'whole person' comprehensive healthcare. The biggest thing I have learned from my time at Alliance is the importance of vulnerability and unconditional acceptance. Vulnerability is the key to growth and it is only through fostering an environment of acceptance that people can be vulnerable enough for healing to take place."
L to R:  Brad Steed with volunteer Cooking Matters instructor Lindsey Miller.

L to R:  Brad Steed with volunteer Cooking Matters instructor Lindsey Miller.

Brad Steed: Brad is finishing his undergraduate studies at Appalachian State University and will receive his bachelor's degree in Health Care Management. Brad is long time family friends with Megg Rader and Sheryl Joyner, so he has always been aware of Alliance. It was not until he became interested in health care that he saw Alliance as an opportunity to not only help out but grow personally as well. Brad plans to come back to Raleigh after graduation and pursue a career in either pharmaceuticals or health administration. Brad also plans to record music in his free time. 

"[I appreciate] the fact that Alliance focuses on the "whole" person (mind, body, soul) when treating patients. I think each of those three aspects is as important as the next for over-all health and well-being."

Interested in volunteering or interning?  

July 2017 Garden Update: Jesse Crouch, Garden & Wellness Coordinator

Summer is coming and going quickly in the Alliance Community Garden. With the warm temperatures, our cool season crops like swiss chard, beets, kale, collards, and lettuce have made their way out and made room for our flourishing tomatoes, okra, beans, cucumbers, watermelon, and peppers.

The garden has been an invaluable resource in our latest Cooking Matters classes. It has been a tremendous pleasure and privilege to introduce patients to healthy food just as it comes out of the ground and help forge a strong connection with food!

We are grateful to volunteers from groups including Crossroads Fellowship and Edenton Street United Methodist, and to those faithful individuals who lend their hand to harvest, weed, and water.

The award for biggest plants is a tie between our okra and tomatoes, both of which are stretching 7 feet up toward the sky and growing. I'll be needing a ladder soon to grab them!

My personal favorite vegetable to grow in the summer is okra. You'll find beautiful yellow and red flowers all over!  Once they are pollinated (by our very own honey bees!) they develop into the okra pods.

Although our tomatoes are a bit sick with 'early blight', a common fungus affecting the plant's leaves, we've already harvested about 230 pounds and anticipate another 200 before the season is done! So far this July we've harvested about 440 pounds of fresh, organically grown produce for our patients, pushing us past the 1,000 pound mark for the year! We're looking forward to a productive rest of the summer and fall.

Come dig in our garden!

Join us for our regular Garden Work Days. Learn a thing or two about our garden and bees and help provide fresh produce for our patients. RSVP or just drop in! garden@alliancemedicalministry.org

Second Saturdays, 9 am to 12 pm
August 12 / September 9 / October 14 / November 11

Fourth Wednesdays, 5 pm to 7 pm
August 23 / September 27 / October 25

Patient Spotlight: Maryse Joseph

L to R:  Volunteer Cooking Matters instructor Lindsey Miller, Alliance patient Maryse Joseph, and Garden and Wellness Coordinator Jesse Crouch at Cooking Matters graduation.  

L to R:  Volunteer Cooking Matters instructor Lindsey Miller, Alliance patient Maryse Joseph, and Garden and Wellness Coordinator Jesse Crouch at Cooking Matters graduation.  

Maryse Joseph moved to Wake County, and like many, did not have health insurance. In 2008, WakeMed referred her to Alliance Medical Ministry after a brief hospitalization. She has been a regular patient of Dr. Sheryl Joyner since.

A few years ago, Maryse became critically ill and was hospitalized again.  After release, she met with Dr. Joyner and says her life changed as a result of Dr. Joyner's compassion.  

"Dr. Joyner told me that every day while I was in the hospital, she checked up on me.  She encouraged me, telling me, 'Maryse, if you can leave the hospital, you need to survive and keep fighting.  You can make it!'  That changed my life."

Maryse works as a CNA at a nursing home, and translates Dr. Joyner's compassion into her work.  "Dr. Joyner taught me to do everything with my heart. At Alliance, I've felt like I'm an important person. The way you talk to people can change so much.  So many people see your skin color and hear your accent, and may not want you. Dr. Joyner takes time to listen to me.  She sees the human being."

Maryse won second place in the Million Step Challenge, receiving FitBits for her family members. 

Maryse won second place in the Million Step Challenge, receiving FitBits for her family members. 

Last year, Maryse discovered that she was pre-diabetic and at risk of developing diabetes. Dr. Joyner invited her to participate in the Million Step Challenge program in partnership with WakeMed Hospital. 

Through this initiative, Maryse received a FitBit, and walked 1,785,204 in 112 days, taking second place in the Million Step Challenge!  Even since the MSC ended, Maryse continues to exercise, waking up between 4:30 and 5:00 am daily to walk.  "I've lost nine pounds! And I'm keeping it off with healthier eating."

This summer, Maryse has participated in the summer Cooking Matters classes, offered in partnership with the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle.

“Everyone can participate. Families come with their kids. We learn we don’t need a lot of money to eat healthy."

Maryse dicing a fresh zucchini from Inter-Faith Food Shuttle for a delicious breakfast dish.

Maryse dicing a fresh zucchini from Inter-Faith Food Shuttle for a delicious breakfast dish.

Support patients like Maryse today with a gift:

Cooking Matters @ Alliance Class 6: Natalie Holdstock, Intern

During our final Cooking Matters class, we discussed how smoothies are an easy and delicious way to incorporate more nutrient dense food in your everyday diet. Leafy greens, like spinach and kale, are an excellent source of vitamins. Spinach and kale are mild in taste, and can be added without changing or taking away from the sweetness of the fruit in the smoothie. 

Our second meal featured during our last class was an amazing salad bar. The class discussed how salads can be delicious without having to douse them in salad dressing.

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Our volunteer instructor, Lindsey Miller, had some great salad dressing recipes that were light but also added some great flavor!

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Salad Dressings

#1 Rule: 2 parts oil, 1 part acid, salt and pepper

Balsamic Vinaigrette:

3-4 tbsp. olive oil

2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

1 tbsp. dijon

Salt and pepper 

 

Greek:

2 tbsp. olive oil

2 tsp. red wine vinegar 

1/2 tsp lemon juice

Garlic powder

Oregano

Basil

Salt and pepper

Asian:

2 tbsp. olive oil

2 tsp. balsamic 

2 tsp. honey

Splash of soy sauce

*Add: ginger

*Add: sesame seeds

 

 

The "Lindsey":

2 tbsp. olive oil

2 tsp. AVC

2 tsp. honey

1 tbsp. dijon

Congratulations to the graduates!

We wrapped up our last session with a class graduation. Each participant received a certificate of completion as well as their last produce bag provided by the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle. We enjoyed having everyone so much and hope that our participants learned a lot over the course of this class.